Accents and Taps


Shawnlet Bucks (ca. 2004) is a straightforward approach to working on accents and taps in a battery setting that allows you to keep things interesting while maintaining the ensemble’s focus on the important fundamentals.

There is a detailed description on the *.pdf, but the main idea is to string sequences of variations together. Maybe there’s a cool combination that is your go-to accent/tap warm-up, but the sky is really the limit. These recordings provide a few examples:

Example 1. S: 3, 2, 2, 1; T: 1, 2, 1, 3, 1; B: 5, 3. Example 2. S: 5, 3, 2; T: 3, 2, 5; B: 2, 5, 3.
Example 3. S: 1, 1, 4, 2, 2; T: 1, 2, 3, 4; B: 1, 1, 5, 3. Example 4. S: 7, 2, 2, 3, 1; T: 5, 2, 2, 3, 3; B: 4, 8, 2, 1.
Example 5. S: 3, 3, 3, 5, 1; T: 6, 2, 1, 4, 1, 1; B: 9, 3, 2, 1. Example 6. S: 5, 4, 3, 2, 3; T: 3, 5, 4, 5; B: 4, 5, 3, 2, 2, 1

 

Accent Tap (2008) is a comprehensive two-height warm-up that covers buck figures, accent-tap contexts, singlestroke figures, and paradiddle figures. It was written with the goal of being part of the NCSU Drumline warm-up repertoire, but John wrote an on-field warm-up with more brevity and focus. This, however, is a good long warm-up to work on accents and taps, with some groovy interludes. It's based on Groovement Movement from the original FatMattDrums, and I think it would be a great étude for any level of drumline with time enough to work on the details.